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CRESCENDO event at COP23: 15 November 2017, 10:00 – 11:15 European Union Pavilion, Bonn, Germany

Using advanced Earth system models to deliver reliable estimates of future global change

Realizing the Paris Agreement: A rapidly closing window of opportunity

Human activity, notably the emission of carbon dioxide (CO2), is changing the climate. Presently, only ~50% of emitted CO2 remains in the atmosphere causing the climate to warm. The remaining 50% is absorbed by the Earth’s natural carbon sinks, on land and in the ocean. If the efficiency of these sinks decreases in the future in response to climate change, then for a given emission of CO2 a larger fraction of the gas will remain in the atmosphere, causing greater warming than occurs today. For low warming targets the CO2 emission space available to realize these targets is already very small.

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The science of climate change communication: CRESCENDO workshop to gain confidence, experience and knowledge. 25th Sept 2017, Paris, France

By Alberto Muñoz (UNIVLEEDS, UK), Nada Caud (IPSL-CNRS, France) and Asher Minns (UEA, UK).

There is a wealth of scientific evidence for climate change – enough to fill five IPCC reports – but there is much less known about how to communicate this climate change research to the public. On September 25th CRESCENDO organised a one-day practical workshop for early and mid-career researchers in CRESCENDO to gain knowledge of the science of climate change communication, and the confidence to apply this knowledge in practice with non-academic audiences.

The training day was led by Asher Minns, RT5 leader in CRESCENDO and Head of Communication at the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, in partnership with Chris Shaw of Climate Outreach in a workshop co-created by Asher and Adam Corner as part of the HELIX project.

The workshop consisted of 5 sessions and covered a set of very clear aims:

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CRESCENDO Scientists Organise Earth System Model Evaluation Workshop, Aspen Global Change Institute, 30th July – 4th August 2017

By Peter Cox (UNEXE, UK).

CRESCENDO was heavily-involved in a highly-creative workshop on Model Evaluation at the Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) this summer (http://www.agci.org/event/17s2 ). The workshop was co-directed by Veronika Eyring and Peter Cox of CRESCENDO, in partnership with Peter Gleckler (Lawrence Livermore) and Greg Flato (Canadian Climate Centre). Its aims were closely aligned to some of the key goals of CRESCENDO, namely to ‘contribute to reducing the spread of climate projections by enabling more complete evaluation of model outputs against observations, and by identifying Emergent Constraints – observable aspects of the contemporary Earth System that are most closely related to future projections’.

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CRESCENDO supports UKESM team to showcase UK Earth system science at the Royal Society Summer science exhibition, 3 to 9 July 2017, London, UK

By Alberto Munoz (UNIVLEEDS, UK). This summer CRESCENDO supported the UKESM team (www.ukesm.ac.uk) and the National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) to participate at the Royal Society summer science exhibition (3 to 9 July 2017) in London, a unique opportunity to showcase the status of the UK Earth system modelling science and help the general […]

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CRESCENDO is supporting policy makers on routes to realizing the 2015 Paris Agreement, 28 Feb 2017, Brussels

“Cooperation between Earth System Models and Integrated Assessment Models as done in CRESCENDO will help us to implement the Paris climate targets. It will provide insights on the efforts needed to implement these targets as well as the benefits”. This statement from Colin Jones, CRESCENDO Project Coordinator, was one of the most important take-home messages […]

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CRESCENDO WP1 Meeting on land use implementation into ESMs

30-31 Jan 2017, Hamburg, MPI-M (Geomatikum Building, Bundesstr. 55, room 1729)

Conveners: Victor Brovkin and Lena Boysen (MPI, Germany)

The meeting of CRESCENDO terrestrial modelling groups was dedicated to the preparation of experiments designed to quantify land use effect on climate. 20 scientists from 7 European ESM groups discussed new aspects of the land use change (LUC) dataset prepared for the historical CMIP6 simulation. This new LUC forcing is much more complex than it was for CMIP5. How could models with different land cover structure interpret LUC scenarios in a consistent way? For example, this new forcing includes rangeland as a new LUC class. Some models assume that rangelands are natural vegetation and ignore the new class, while others treat rangelands as pastures, which are cleaned of forests, and suppress fires etc. Another divergence issue is on sub-grid scale transitions. Several models use so-called gross transitions accounting for crop rotations within grid cell, while others use simplified net transitions. Gross transitions are more difficult to implement; however, they better reflect changes in the land carbon budget. These and other details of the LUC dataset and their usage in ESMs were intensely discussed in a Q&A telecon session with George Hurtt of the University of Maryland, head of the group developing the land use forcing for CMIP6.

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The 2nd workshop on the technical development of the Earth System Model Evaluation Tool (ESMValTool)

15-16 November 2016, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU), Germany

Conveners: Veronika Eyring, Björn Brötz, Axel Lauer, Alexander Löw, Ben Müller, and Mattia Righi

The 2nd workshop on the technical development of the Earth System Model Evaluation Tool (ESMValTool) was held at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU) in the Department of Geography from 15-16 November 2016. The ESMValTool is developed as a community system, open to both users and developers, hence encouraging open exchange of evaluation methods and results (Eyring et al., 2016c). This will facilitate and improve Earth System Model (ESM) evaluation beyond the state-of-the-art and aims at supporting model evaluation and development activities at individual modelling centres and within the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP). It is envisaged to run the tool routinely on model output submitted to CMIP Phase 6 (CMIP6, Eyring et al. (2016a)), utilizing observations and reanalyses available through the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) in standard formats (obs4MIPs/ana4MIPs) or provided by the user.


To download the workshop summary as pdf click here


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CRESCENDOschools network – studying climate science with school students more important than ever

By Alberto Muñoz (UNIVLEEDS, UK), Helena Martins (SMHI, Sweden) and Nada Caud (IPSL-CNRS, France).

The CRESCENDOschools network has just started work on an exciting new goal of partnering some of our research institutes with nearby schools.  We will be working and interacting with 16-18 years old students to co-develop novel, educational and informative materials and activities on climate change and climate models. Three schools in Europe have already embarked on this new venture which will see students, teachers and researchers meeting up over the next year to work together on new ways to share project finding with the wider community and increase awareness and understanding about the science behind climate change.

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Doubling of CO2 will cause global plant photosynthesis to increase by a third, study from CRESCENDO´s scientists conclude (Wenzel et al. 2016, Nature)

Doubling of CO2 will cause global plant photosynthesis to increase by a third, study from CRESCENDO´s scientists conclude Vegetation and soil are currently slowing down global warming by absorbing about a quarter of human emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2). This land carbon sink is believed to be in part due to increases in photosynthesis. This new […]

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CRESCENDO supports carbon cycle planning workshop

The carbon cycle is a key component of the climate system and supporting carbon cycle development, simulations and analysis is a central strand of CRESCENDO.

By Chris Jones (MOHC, UK). 23-24 May, 2016. UPMC Jussieu campus, Paris, France

In May, 15 scientists, including representative from 6 CRESCENDO partners met in Paris to discuss and finalise experiment plans for C4MIP: the Coupled Climate-carbon cycle Model Intercomparison Project (www.c4mip.net)

Chris Jones from the Met Office Hadley Centre, co-chair of C4MIP and CRESCENDO RT lead for Evaluation (RT2), organised the workshop which was supported by CRESCENDO travel funding and kindly hosted by CRECENDO partner, IPSL in Paris. The workshop was targeted at European carbon cycle modellers: “We thought about hosting the meeting in Exeter”, Chris explained, “but we wanted to minimise travel time and carbon emissions which made Paris – a much more central and accessible venue – the perfect option.”

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